Best Places to Retire eNews
Sign up here for FREE alerts on new places to retire & practical articles.
 
Name
Email
 
 
 
Forward to a Friend | print
Bookmark and Share
My search for the (almost) perfect retirement climate
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Retirement Community Forum Home -> Where I've Been, Where I'm Looking
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
JonyakaLena



Joined: 17 Jul 2011
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2011 6:36 pm    Post subject: Re: Looking in Hill Country TX Reply with quote

NPerez wrote:
I've been watching all the traffic and a lot of good locations are coming up, but what about Georgetown TX (just north of Austin TX). Housing cost less than $250K in Dell Webb-Sun City. Property Tax about $4K, but no state income tax.

Temperatures seem pleasing, although it does get near 100 degrees in summer and does get below freezing in winter. I haven't lived there but understand that the humidity isn't the worst in the country.

Thoughts??


I'm going to have to disagree with you on the Austin area. It gets about 5 degrees above Hell in the summer. I like the winter months just fine. Not extreme. But I've known people to get a serious burn leaning their arm on their car roof in the summer. I love Austin's vibe. Lots to do and people are very friendly. But the exteme heat and humidity make it a no go for me to retire. I want lower humidity and less heat.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
JonyakaLena



Joined: 17 Jul 2011
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2011 6:51 pm    Post subject: Has anyone considered Eureka Springs, Arkansas? Reply with quote

We have visited Eureka Springs twice in the past two years and loved the people and the artistic zeal there. The history and architecture are interesting. It is very green and lush. I loved the early Spring weather and there is lots of wildlife with great fishing and water sports. However, the summer was very hot and humid. Not as bad as New Orleans. I haven't yet been there in the winter.

The cost of living was quite reasonable, but the medical facilities are not modern. You need to drive a good 45 minutes to the nearest large medical facility..

Has anyone else looked here?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
JonyakaLena



Joined: 17 Jul 2011
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2011 6:58 pm    Post subject: Renting in a Retirement Community? Reply with quote

scottp wrote:
Arlene, those are all very good reasons for a R55 community, and all of them would be high on my list. Thanks for the tips and R55 living has just moved up a couple rungs on the options ladder ! Very Happy Finding a community with a good HOA is obviously very key.

Roseburg looked pretty good to me (climate wise) Sunday evening but I have also been thinking about the strategy that John mentioned in his last weekly newsletter. I've been keeping an eye on Cheyenne, WO. WO is a very low tax state, Cheyenne is just north of the Colorado border, would be a good place to declare as my official residence for the summer months and then either be a snowbird or just become a nomad in the winter. And a R55 community with a good HOA sounds like a good fit for that, because as John mentions in the piece, I would want a place I could just "lock and leave" for weeks or months in the winter.


Is it possible to rent a home in a retirement community?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
JonyakaLena



Joined: 17 Jul 2011
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Wed Jul 27, 2011 3:56 pm    Post subject: Re: Houston has good weather AND humidity Reply with quote

sandimcg wrote:
I like the Houston area but hate the humidity. They have fantastic medical facilities, VERY reasonable prices on nice-sized homes, umpteen golf courses and golf schools, great just about everything. There are all sorts of areas outside of Houston proper - the Woodlands, Clear Lake City, etc. I just don't like the humidity.

My favorite spot is northern CA because of the sunny pleasant days and crispy nights. But, of course, the state is in a fiscal mess brought on by 30 years of credit card spending. The taxes are already high and only going higher. Alas, I doubt they'll get out of that mess before we retire.


I live part time in the Galleria area of Houston. There is always something to do at your fingertips. We looked into Kingwood and Woodlands so we could bring our dogs with us. We loved both of these areas. Kingwood offers everything you could need, including great shopping ladies. Unfortunately, the easy 30 minute drive to the office in the Galleria area became a 1 and 1/2 hour nerve bending treck in rush hour. Too stressful. And, yes you are right about the heat and humidity.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
scottp



Joined: 01 Jan 1970
Posts: 38

PostPosted: Sat Jul 30, 2011 3:47 pm    Post subject: Re: Renting in a Retirement Community? Reply with quote

JonyakaLena wrote:

Is it possible to rent a home in a retirement community?


Not completely sure about renting for an extended period of time, but many places offer "stay and play" packages to allow you to get a brief feel for the area. I don't know for sure but I suspect these are just for maybe a week or two. I'm sure if you contacted a community you were considering they could tell you what they offer.

Also, you asked about Eureka Springs AR. I have not looked there myself but happen to stumble upon this article with a short review of the area:

http://www.greatretirementspots.com/short-profiles-eureka-springs-arkansas.htm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
JonyakaLena



Joined: 17 Jul 2011
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 1:15 am    Post subject: Re: Renting in a Retirement Community? Reply with quote

scottp wrote:
JonyakaLena wrote:

Is it possible to rent a home in a retirement community?


Not completely sure about renting for an extended period of time, but many places offer "stay and play" packages to allow you to get a brief feel for the area. I don't know for sure but I suspect these are just for maybe a week or two. I'm sure if you contacted a community you were considering they could tell you what they offer.

Also, you asked about Eureka Springs AR. I have not looked there myself but happen to stumble upon this article with a short review of the area:

http://www.greatretirementspots.com/short-profiles-eureka-springs-arkansas.htm


Thanks so much for the information. Jony
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jancullinane



Joined: 21 Oct 2008
Posts: 20

PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 3:16 pm    Post subject: Renting in a retirement community Reply with quote

In a resort-style master-planned community, and in many active-adult communities, you can rent, but the length of time can vary - some may only allow longer term rentals (three months minimum or perhaps even a year); others allow nightly/weekly rentals. You do need to check out the community and see what the guidelines are for the one(s) you're considering. Rental guidelines would be laid out in the Master Declaration of the HOA (Home Owner Association) documents.

Some people purchase a home in their ultimate retirement location and rent it until they move there full-time. Sometimes, there is a bit of friction between the renters and the full-time residents. You may want to check this out by talking to residents (and renters) in a community you're considering.

Jan Cullinane, The New Retirement: The Ultimate Guide to the Rest of Your Life (Rodale)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jlh44music



Joined: 19 Jan 2010
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2012 3:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just found this thread, some great information, thank you all for sharing your experiences. We're in Boston and are looking to move out west. We want a dry climate (arthritis), we don't like humidity so the SE is out. We visited AZ last summer (Flagstaff in particular), nice but too isolated even though it has almost everything you'd need right there. Drove through Prescott, Sedona, Verde Valley and flew into Phoenix (we don't like southern AZ, TOO hot). Next we're planning a trip to Carson City (flying into San Fran)...we like CA but too pricey! Northern NV interests us (but I'm curious about someone's comments about staying away from NV?) Minden and Garderville are on the list. We have a camper so we plan to do some traveling and exploring the area. And we like that it's close enough to CA to visit. Jann
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gingermc



Joined: 01 Jan 1970
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2012 3:40 am    Post subject: Finally; a conversation about the West! Reply with quote

I've lived almost all my life west of the Mississippi, and here I am for the last 5 years in Albany, NY. What was I thinking? I am 63 and want to get away from the winters, but alas, I work for State of NY. Still, I'm getting out soon. Now...about the places you have all been discussing:

Lived for 5 years in Las Vegas. If you can handle extreme dry summer heat, LV is wonderful. Always something to do, really reasonable home prices, low taxes. But the summers are HOT! Good location too; not too far to drive to Arizona and visit Prescott, or go west to LA or San Diego. Or east to Grand Canyon. Northern Nevada can be very nice, but they do have winter and sometimes it is pretty rough.

Lived for over 30 years in San Francisco and the climate is wonderful, the culture is wonderful, but the cost is SO prohibitive. Southern California is warmer, but super traffic. Also very expensive. And the state is in trouble financially.

Lived for 3 years in Tacoma WA and have spent time throughout the NE. For the most part it is too gloomy for me. Overcast, drizzly, grey and cold for about 9 months a year. And they do have some ferocious ice storms and snow storms. Hood River is great in summer but gets really bad ice storms, as does Portland.

Ashland OR is lovely but overpriced. Roseburg is fairly nice weather but honestly...pretty boring. Not much happening there at all. If I were going to go in that area I would go to Eugene, which gets a lot of rain but is a very lively university town.

Now...on to Arizona. I have spent time in Tucson, and actually had a medical emergency there and got very good care at St. Joseph's hospital. Not sure why someone said the medical facilities were lacking. I think Oro Valley on the north side of Tucson is especially lovely; the desert there is gorgeous, with giant saguaro cacti and flowering shrubs throughout. However, there are two or three months of very hot weather in summer. If you were able to travel for those few months in summer, this would be a lovely place to live. Beautiful scenery, great music scene in Tucson with live music venues abounding, many cultural activities around the university...golf courses everywhere if you like that. Low taxes. Property values are reasonable. Tucson is cooler than Phoenix, which is like living on the face of the sun. the last time I was thee I flew in at 11pm, and it was still 107 degrees. Ouch! Yes it was a heatwave but still....

I love Prescott for it's artsy feel and old west ambiance. I worry that it might get a little cold in winter. I'm now looking at Cottonwood area. Sedona has great weather and is amazingly beautiful, but is too pricey for me. But I am poor and probably looking for a mobile home park. Jerome is also very attractive but I don't think I could live there; it feels like you are going to fall off the hillside every time you walk down the street! Gets pretty windy, too.

Southern Utah is also very beautiful but gets HOT in summer. No matter what the data seems to say, I have spent time all over southern Utah and trust me, it gets HOT. I'm okay with that but it doesn't sound like you are.

I think New Mexico has some good spots to consider, and my main reason for not considering it is the distance from California, which is where many of my relatives and friends live. I can drive there pretty quickly from no. Arizona, but it is much further from New Mexico.

I grew up in Oklahoma and Texas and have this to say: stay away. It is very humid, and tornados are a huge risk and very prevalent. And it can get cold in winter. Actually there is nothing I like about Texas at all, even though I have lived there several years as a young adult. Too hot in summer, too many storms, too many rednecks driving trucks with gun racks. Too many bible thumpers. Just not good. Sorry to whomever I have offended.

I think western colorado, new mexico and northern arizona are your best bets.

One more IMPORTANT point: DEW POINT! Dew point is a much better indicator of relative comfort in a climate. If you simply look at average humidity percentages (like on city-data), you would find that Albany NY and Tampa FL have almost identical relative humidity. But the dew point is MUCH higher in Tampa. Same with the west coast. It isn't that humidity is low there, but the dew point is low. That is why the west coast feels so much more comfortable (as far as stickiness) than east coast. And why my hair doesn't curl on the west coast, but does on the east coast. You can find lots of data about dew point averages by city and state on the internet. That's what you should be looking at, but I will tell you in a nutshell that the dew point averages in the west are much lower. Well, in those areas that are warmer. NY has better dew point averages than Florida, that's why Florida feels more humid. But who wants to freeze in NY to have a lower dew point?

All the western states have a better comfort index because the dew point is lower. But you pay a price, as property costs more than it does in the east generally.

I hope this helps and I am enjoying all the other thoughts and suggestions. I'm going to be looking at Rio Rancho next, even though I think it is too far from CA. Still got to look. Good luck to all!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
scottp



Joined: 01 Jan 1970
Posts: 38

PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2012 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

gingermc - Thanks SO MUCH for all this useful info. As I've said in previous posts, first hand knowledge like this is invaluable. All the info I've shared is strictly from research I've done on the internet. I'm disappointed to hear you think Roseburg is boring. I think it and Prescott are my top two candidates right now based strictly on watching the weather in those areas about once a week. Obviously I need to check these places out for myself first hand someday.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gingermc



Joined: 01 Jan 1970
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2012 10:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My impressions of Roseburg are from a few visits; I haven't spent a lot of time there. But my impressions are that it is a fairly quiet, somewhat conservative town that does attract quite a few retirees. I'm not sure what you are looking for but I imagine you as someone who is fairly active, and I think the only activities available there would be things like walking, running, fishing...??? Not much there in terms of dining, shows, museums, art, etc., etc. But then, I'm more of a city girl. Perhaps you like a very quiet life. I want to be someplace that has stuff going on: groups to join where you learn spanish or play bridge or discuss books, clubs that have live music, museums that have rotating exhibits, interesting restaurants to try, political events to attend or not, as well as outdoor activities. I'm single, and that may make a difference too. You haven't mentioned a family, so my assumption is that you are single and would be looking for a place where you can get involved and meet people.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
scottp



Joined: 01 Jan 1970
Posts: 38

PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 11:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Admin: Can this false posting be deleted?

Last edited by scottp on Mon Oct 01, 2012 11:40 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
scottp



Joined: 01 Jan 1970
Posts: 38

PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 11:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ginger, you got one out of two right. Very Happy

I am single, but I'm not really interested in shows, museums, art, so the "quiet life" might be for me after all ! I do like to golf and the great outdoors, but I'm also happy sitting on a porch reading.

Another town I've been looking at is Twin Falls, ID. Climate seems to be about the same as here in NY (winters as well as summers) but less humid. Have you any experience passing thru there?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gingermc



Joined: 01 Jan 1970
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2012 12:42 am    Post subject: Idaho Reply with quote

Hi Scott, where have you been? I have spent time in Idaho, but more northern, like C'ouer d'Alene. Idaho is very beautiful, and reminds me a bit of NY state, but of course the mountains are higher. Winters in northern Idaho can be quite formidable, but my reading on Boise and Twin Falls is that the winters are really pretty mild. Boise seems to have a pretty nice climate, with an average winter low of 30, rarely dipping below 20, and an average July high of 90. However, there is virtually no humidity which would make both highs and lows feel milder than we are used to in NY. Snow, but in small amounts rarely exceeding 3 inches. In fact, I'm so impressed with my reading on Boise that I am now considering researching it more thoroughly. I am a little concerned about it having a large LDS population. No offense to anyone, but I have lived in LV which has a large LDS population, and I am not a fan of the religion or the political views that seem to accompany that religion. Beyond that, many things about Boise are appealing: good medical care, good airport, reasonable housing costs, good art scene, good outdoor activities easily accessible. Twin Falls, on paper, has slightly more extreme weather. More snow. Population of 44,000. Not as much access to good medical care and good airport. But it might be nice. I'm more interested in Boise.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
New Chapter



Joined: 01 Jan 1970
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2012 4:27 pm    Post subject: perfect climate Reply with quote

We've been looking into Cedar City, UT, 4k feet above St. George, UT. My wife took a day trip there while in Vegas and had nothing but good things to say about it. It's within 60 mi. of 5 Natl. Parks and doesn't have the weather extremes of a St. Geo. or Tuscon, AZ. Beautiful and reasonably priced homes aplenty, in the 250k and below range.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Retirement Community Forum Home -> Where I've Been, Where I'm Looking All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
Page 6 of 7

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Custom Search



Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group