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Valencia Cay at Riverland brings the best of GL Homes’ famous Valencia 55+ lifestyle to Port St. Lucie on Florida’s East Coast. Homeowner...

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UNIQUE MILITARY RETIREMENT COMMUNITY, "THE PLACE PATRIOTS CALL HOME"WHO WE AREPrimarily a...

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A Stress-Free Decision for Better Living. Traditions of America at Silver Spring is located in the  #2 "least stressful place to liv...

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Valencia Bonita by GL Homes introduces a new standard of 55 + living in Bonita Springs, on Florida's beautiful Gulf Coast. Homeowners can...

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Located near one of America's top college towns - Chapel Hill, NC - Fearrington Village is a planned community of nearly 2000 people, cra...

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Life at Heritage Shores is full of amenities, activities and social opportunities. When you live here, each day can be as active or laid ...

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Is 10,000 Steps a Day the Right Number?

Category: Health and Wellness Issues

August 21, 2019 – New research from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston suggests that the magical goal of 10,000 steps a day might not be the right number. The research, conducted among women aged 62 to 101, found that the quartile that averaged 4,400 steps a day had a 41% increase in longevity compared to the lowest quartile, which averaged only 2,700 steps. There were modest longevity gains in the third quartile (average of 7,500 steps), but no noticeable improvement in the 4th quartile (more than 7,500).

Courtesy of Ricardo Esquivel 

The magic number of 10,000 steps appears to have little if any scientific basis. It appears to have been started by a Japanese company that manufactured a pedometer, whose Japanese name meant 10,000 steps meter in English. One thing that 10,000 steps would do for you is to get you closer to an average of 30 minutes of exercise per day, although it is not clear that would result in an improvement over a more modest amount.

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Posted by Admin on August 21st, 2019

Bizarre Lists for Best and Worst States for Retirement: Who Are These Companies?

Category: Best Retirement Towns and States

August 21, 2019 — There seems to be a never ending supply of articles touting the best and worst states to retire in. People obviously enjoy reading them. The trouble is that many of the websites publishing them have no expertise in retirement, and a result the lists they come up often have no connection to where people actually want to retire.

A good example is the recent list from Bankrate.com, which must have been overjoyed to see their picks reprinted in the New York Times and many other big media outlets. For the record, Bankrate.com is a website that promotes credit cards and loans, very similar to what wallethub.com does (but which generally produces more credible lists). Other frequent list generators are GOBankingRates.com and Smartasset.com, the latter of which is a site promoting financial advisors. Search on Google for “best places to retire” and sites like these will have prominent rankings, because it is good for their financial businesses. See the top listing in this screen capture, Homesnacks.net – anyone see their connection to retirement? (see more list companies at end)

Here is the list of Best States to retire from Bankrate.com:

  • Nebraska
  • Iowa
  • Missouri
  • South Dakota
  • Florida
  • Kentucky
  • Kansas
  • North Carolina
  • Montana
  • Hawaii
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Posted by Admin on August 20th, 2019

Claiming Social Security: The Most Popular Questions

Category: Financial and taxes in retirement

August 14, 2019 — Some of the questions about Social Security that come up most frequently concern claiming benefits. People are confused or unsure about when they can claim, how much they will receive, spousal benefits (including those for divorced people), special filing strategies, etc. This article will go over some of those questions and, hopefully, provide helpful answers.

When can I claim Social Security retirement benefits? Most people have a pretty good idea of the answer to this question – the earliest you can claim is age 62. The longer you wait to claim, the higher your benefit, up until age 70.

What is my “Full Retirement Age” (FRA)? This is the age when you fully qualify for your Social Security benefits. For people born between 1943 and 1954 the FRA is age 66. For those born in 1955 or after, it increases two month per year until it reaches age 67 for those born in 1960 or later. Note that “Full” is not a totally logical term, since if you delay collecting your benefits past your FRA you will get higher than “full” benefits anytime up to age 70.

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Posted by Admin on August 13th, 2019

Move or Stay in Retirement? Big Questions to Answer

Category: Retirement Planning

August 6, 2019 — Perhaps the most fundamental question you face in retirement is to move or not. You might be considering retiring from the midwest, for example, to the Sunbelt. Or from the suburbs to a city or active adult community. You decision might not mean moving far; perhaps just relocating to a more age-appropriate home in the area where you live now. Whatever you decide, we think that if you are going to do a good job of retiring, you need to answer the question.

As for where to retire, that is mostly what this site is about. We’ve written all kinds of articles about the possibilities, with reviews of thousands of towns and communities to explore. So in this one we are going to try to answer some of the questions that might come up as you think about whether you should move or not. (Thanks to Jeanette Pavini of TheStreet.com for posing these questions we answered in an article at TheStreet.com)


Q: How should someone determine if they should stay in their current home/location to retire, or if they should consider moving?
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A:  As we said up top, this is a hugely important question for retirees. The type of home you live in and where it is located can have a profound impact on your retirement lifestyle. Most people are comfortable living where they have always lived, so it is a big deal to consider moving. There is hassle, expense, and the fear and uncertainty of moving to the unknown. Your social life will be majorly affected.

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Posted by Admin on August 5th, 2019