Showcase Listing

Traditions of America is excited to bring the 55+ Live Better lifestyle to Bethlehem with its latest community - Traditions of America at...

Image
Showcase Listing

Life at Heritage Shores is full of amenities, activities and social opportunities. When you live here, each day can be as active or laid ...

Image
Showcase Listing

Fairfield Glade, a stunning master-planned community, is perched high atop the Cumberland Plateau, and offers serene mountain beauty as i...

Image
Showcase Listing

Set amidst the picturesque, quintessential landscape of Lancaster County, Traditions of America is excited to introduce Traditions of Ame...

Image
Showcase Listing

Cresswind Charleston is Charleston-area's BEST active adult lifestyle community. Cresswind inspires active adults to live life to the ful...

Image
Showcase Listing

Welcome to Cresswind Charlotte!  This nature-rich refuge of inviting streetscapes, manicured landscaping and miles of walking trails...

Image

SECURE Act for 401(k)s and IRAs Signed into Law: Good (mostly) and Bad News (for heirs):

Category: Financial and taxes in retirement

December 22, 2019 – The SECURE Act has been passed by the Senate and House and signed by the President.  The bipartisan bill, Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement, has several key provisions that impact many of those who are currently retired as well as people planning for retirement. 

Good news. The bill allows for people over 70 and one half who are still working to continue to contribute to regular IRAs – there is no longer an age restriction for making such contributions.   Perhaps the most important provision is the one affecting people who will not have reached age 70 and 1/2 by December 31, 2019.  The new law raises the age for taking Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) from 70 and 1/2 to 72. These two provisions allow people who have not yet reached the age of 70 and 1/2 to achieve higher IRA and 401(k) balances for retirement if they are currently working and/or have enough non-IRA investment assets to defer taking IRA minimum distributions for an additional two years.  This can provide for a higher likelihood of not outliving retirement savings. Unfortunately, if you were already 70 and 1/2 before 2020, you still have to take the RMDs required under the previous law.

(more…)
Posted by Admin on December 21st, 2019

Is Retirement Turning You Into a Cheapskate?

Category: Financial and taxes in retirement

December 7, 2019 — We don’t know about your experience, but in ours we are starting to see signs that many of our retired friends and relatives are getting more and more frugal. Some have to cut back from necessity, but even many of our very well off friends seem to be pinching pennies, at least in some corners of their life. Folks that might fly business class to Australia on a luxury vacation, but hoard plastic bags from the supermarket to line their kitchen trash bin. Many like to save money for the sport of it. After all, who likes spending money on unimportant stuff. Snagging an inexpensive vacation, landing a great deal on a rental car, or getting a better internet deal is a lot more fun and exciting than paying top dollar!

If you search on the Internet for “live like a cheapskate” you will strike a frugality bonanza. There are authors like Jeff Yeager who have written best sellers on the subject (“The Cheapskate Next Door“). There’s even a show on TLC, “Extreme Cheapskates“. Not to mention all of the articles Topretirements has written on the subject over the years (see Further Reading at bottom). This article will roll up advice from all over into some of our top tips on how to live like a cheapskate, and have fun while doing it!

First of all, a little etymology – if you are going to be a cheapskate you might as well understand where the term came from. Although there is some uncertainty about the origin of the word, the main dictionary sites think that “skate” was a late 19th century slangy term for a worn-out horse, to which cheap was added to imply mean or miserly. One Wiki source claims it refers to inexpensive strap-on roller skates; while we acknowledge those were horrible to skate on back in the day, we doubt that is the term’s origin.

(more…)
Posted by Admin on December 6th, 2019

Windfall Elimination Provision Bill Introduced by Texas Congressman

Category: Financial and taxes in retirement

October 30, 2019 — For years the curiously named Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP) has frustrated countless workers in the public sector. The WEP was created to try to help protect Social Security as well as prevent so called “double-dipping” by public workers who are eligible for pensions as well as Social Security retirement. Most public workers feel that the WEP unfairly takes away some of the benefits they earned from Social Security. Now a Republican Congressman from Texas, Kevin Brady, has proposed its elimination and replacement with a new system. This is his statement:

“For years, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have called for a permanent solution to fix WEP. This arbitrary Washington compromise has resulted in unfair treatment for our teachers, fire fighters, and police officers; and Texans simply cannot afford Congress to remain inactive and let this unfair policy be the law of the land.
Now is the time for Congress to put forth a solution that can actually be signed by the President. This legislation permanently repeals the current WEP, and instead uses a fairer formula that treats public servants like all other American workers. Democrats agree that this is a problem we must address now, and we hope they join us in fixing this long-standing problem this year. While I am introducing a bill today, I am committed to staying at the table to get a bill to the President’s desk.”

The WEP is complicated, and relies on a formula. Basically, if you have less than 30 years of substantial earnings subject to Social Security, you will give up a portion of benefit. For example, if you had less than 20 years of paying into the system and became 62 in 2019, you would forfeit $463 of your promised monthly benefit. If you had 25 years the forfeit $231, and $0 if you had 30 years. SSA has a WEP chart to help you figure this out (see below).

Comments: It is anyone’s guess if Brady’s bill will ever become law. Are you affected by it, and do you think the current system is unfair? Let us know in the Comments section below.

For further reading:

Windfall Elimination Factsheet

Posted by Admin on October 30th, 2019

Claiming Social Security: The Most Popular Questions

Category: Financial and taxes in retirement

August 14, 2019 — Some of the questions about Social Security that come up most frequently concern claiming benefits. People are confused or unsure about when they can claim, how much they will receive, spousal benefits (including those for divorced people), special filing strategies, etc. This article will go over some of those questions and, hopefully, provide helpful answers.

When can I claim Social Security retirement benefits? Most people have a pretty good idea of the answer to this question – the earliest you can claim is age 62. The longer you wait to claim, the higher your benefit, up until age 70.

What is my “Full Retirement Age” (FRA)? This is the age when you fully qualify for your Social Security benefits. For people born between 1943 and 1954 the FRA is age 66. For those born in 1955 or after, it increases two month per year until it reaches age 67 for those born in 1960 or later. Note that “Full” is not a totally logical term, since if you delay collecting your benefits past your FRA you will get higher than “full” benefits anytime up to age 70.

(more…)
Posted by Admin on August 13th, 2019

Did You Hire the Right Financial Advisor?

Category: Financial and taxes in retirement

July 15, 2019 — Hiring a good financial advisor is a difficult job for most people.  Although there is no shortage of solicitations that appear in the newspaper, come in the mail, or through a phone call – how do you know if the person who tells you they are so gifted is really that great? Someone who will look out for your interests, not cheat you, protect your hard earned savings, and actually make your savings grow.  After all, your money represents your financial security, which makes making this decision so important and so difficult.

Who Watches Your Account

A while back we profiled a number of tips for hiring a good financial advisor (see Further Reading at end). This feature will build on that and provide some tips for how to evaluate the person you hired, or the one(s) you might be considering for the job.

Seven things to look for

Trust your instincts.  Your intuitions and first impressions are always important. If you feel like you are being swept along into a decision and little voices tell you something might not be right – stop and listen. Further exploration might clear them up, but never dismiss your reservations.

(more…)
Posted by Admin on July 14th, 2019

What Women Worry About in Retirement

Category: Financial and taxes in retirement

June 24, 2019 — Women tend to do more of the worrying than men, at least in the circles we travel in. And for us men, that is usually a good thing for our preservation. When it comes to women’s big fears about retirement, the research primarily focuses on money concerns, but there is no shortage of other worries. We’ll cover the common concerns that we are aware of, but we are eager to hear what yours are in the Comments section at the end.

Top Worries – Money

A study published by the nonprofit Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies reported that 46% of women were concerned they wouldn’t have a comfortable retirement lifestyle. By comparison, only 31% of men had similar concerns.

(more…)
Posted by Admin on June 23rd, 2019

Little Known, Long Ago Decision Still Affecting Social Security Shortfall

Category: Financial and taxes in retirement

June 16, 2019 — Most of retirement age America, with the possible exception of our elected representatives in Washington, D.C., has some inkling that Social Security retirement is facing big benefit cuts as early as 2034. The commonly held reason why is that are too many baby boomers collecting their Social Security retirement checks, with too few millennials and Gen Xers paying into the system to keep it in balance. While that is not inaccurate, there is another, more fundamental reason for the shortfall, which dates back to the beginning of the Social Security program.

When the program started in the 1930’s there was an intrinsic problem.  Half of the working population at the time was at least halfway towards retirement age. Yet because the program was new, no one had yet contributed anything into the system. It was decided that these Depression-era workers would be given full benefits anyway. Enough money was being collected that benefits could be paid as these workers retired. So they essentially had a windfall – they collected far more than they ever paid into the system. The benefits paid to them would ordinarily have been paid into the trust fund reserves, forever reducing the trust funds.  In retrospect, it might have been better to have funded the shortfall from the general treasury at the time.

(more…)
Posted by Admin on June 16th, 2019

How Much Do I Need for Retirement

Category: Financial and taxes in retirement

June 2, 2019 — The number one Google search about retirement is “How much do I need to retire”. Or, phrased slightly differently, “how much can I spend in retirement”.  It is a tough question, dependent on a lot of factors unique to you. The short answer is: “a lot more than you thought”.

We liken the problem to a maxim our old friend Ralph came up with on a fall camping trip. After a night when the temperature dropped, the fire died down, and we ran out of firewood well before bedtime, he came up with the solution for the next campfire.  Before it gets dark go out and collect about as much wood as you think you will need. Then go back out and gather at least that same amount again…. now you will probably be OK!

Here in this article we will address how to identify how much you need to retire comfortably. We want to stress that people usually underestimate two related things: how much is needed, and how long they will live. To be safe, keep Ralph’s maxim in mind. We will also explain the major withdrawal techniques, and provide a list of the situations that cause people to underestimate their needs.

How much do you need – the budget

The lifestyle you plan to live will determine how much you need. Step 1 is to figure out how much you are spending now, and estimate how that might change once you retire, including estimates for future medical expenses.  You probably won’t spend a whole lot less than you do now, particularly if plan to travel a lot. If you make big changes to where you live, those expenses might go down a lot.

(more…)
Posted by Admin on June 1st, 2019

House Passes SECURE Act 2019: Bill Would Make Big Changes to 401(k) Plans

Category: Financial and taxes in retirement

Updated Dec. 22, 2019 – The SECURE Act was passed by both houses and signed by the President. See: SECURE Act on 401(k)s and IRAs Signed into Law.

May 25, 2019 — The Democratic lead House of Representatives passed a bill this week, the Secure Act of 2019, that would make major changes to 401(k) plans. If it goes into law those changes could have a very positive effect on retirees and people who hope to retire someday. Since neither the Senate nor Pres. Trump seem to have any major objections, the bill seems to have a very good chance of becoming a reality.

The law has come into being as a reaction to a number of factors including a recognition of the growing importance of 401(k) plans, as well as the increasing longevity of Americans dependent on those plans for their financial security. Here are some of the many changes in the Secure Act of 2019, which passed by a whopping 417-3 margin:

  • Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) not required until age 72 (currently required at age 70 and 1/2)
  • Granting companies with 401k plans permission to offer annuities as an investment option
  • Employers must disclose on 401(k) statements the amount of sustainable monthly income the employee’s balance would support
  • Part time workers would be allowed to participate in 401(k) plans
  • Unaffiliated companies could band together to offer 401(k) plans
(more…)
Posted by Admin on May 24th, 2019

Turning 66 This Year? Time Running Out for Social Security’s Restricted Benefit

Category: Financial and taxes in retirement

May 4, 2019 — Were you born before Jan. 2, 1954? Are you married? Not already claiming a Social Security retirement benefit?

If you answered yes to all of these questions, time is running out on a very valuable Social Security claiming strategy, the Restricted Benefit option. In brief, this option allows you (or your spouse) to collect a spousal Social Security benefit while preserving the right to collect on your own benefit later. If you turn 66 this year, now is the time to think about taking it.

The key point for eligibility to take the Restricted Benefit is being born before Jan. 2, 1954. If you were born after that date, the term “deemed filing” applies to you when you apply for Social Security retirement benefits, and you are not eligible for the Restricted Benefit option.

Photo by fotografierende from Pexels

In addition to your birth date, the two additional questions we asked at the beginning also apply. Are you married? If you are not, it doesn’t work because you have no spouse to claim a spousal benefit on. If you are already receiving Social Security benefits, it is too late to reverse that decision. So you answered yes to all three questions – great – the Restricted Benefit might be for you.

But first, a little background.

(more…)
Posted by Admin on May 4th, 2019